LOGIN | CREATE AN ACCOUNT
Contact Us | My Account | Order Tracking | My Favorites | View Cart/Checkout
Free Standard Shipping with $125 minimum purchase*
 
Cheese Meats & Seafood Oil & Vinegar Chocolates & Desserts Fruits & Vegetables Coffee & Beverages Pantry Items Organic & Dietary Prepared Meals Regional Cuisine Gift Boxes & Baskets Create Your Own Basket Of-The-Month Clubs Gift Cards Home & Bath
Buy Italian Meats Online. Salami!
Best Sellers
What's Hot
What's New
On Sale Now
Shop by Brand

Cheese
Chocolates & Desserts
Coffee & Beverages
For The Chef
Fruits & Vegetables
Gourmet Assortments
Home & Bath
Meats & Seafood
Oil & Vinegar
Organic & Dietary
Pantry Items
Prepared Meals

Gift Boxes & Baskets
Ship to Europe
Custom Baskets
Cheese Gifts
Wine Gifts
Monthly Clubs
Gift Certificates
Corporate Gifts
Wholesale
follow igourmet on facebook follow igourmet on twitter follow igourmet on Pinterest
News & Exclusive Sales
About igourmet.com
Shipping Information
Privacy Policy
Cancellations/Returns
FAQs
Fork and the Cork
Events and Tastings
Contact Us
Product List
Ambassador
Order Status
Catalog Request
Recipe Forum
Encyclopedia of Cheese
Press Room
Awards
Gourmet Links
Aged Cheese
Almond Oil
Anchovies
Arborio Rice
Artisan Cheese
Asiago Cheese
Avocado Oil
Bacon
Baking Chocolate
Balsamic Vinegar
Barbecue Sauce
Barbeque Sauce
Bloody Mary Mix
Bleu Cheese
Blue Cheese
Brie Cheese
British Cheese
Burrata Cheese
Butter
Cabot Cheese
California Cheese
Camembert
Caramels
Caviar
Cerignola Olives
Cheddar Cheese
Cheese
Cheese Accompaniments
Cheese Assortments
Cheese Boards
Cheese Encyclopedia
Cheese Fondue
Cheese Knife
Cheese Slicer
Cheesecake
Chevre
Chocolate Fondue
Chocolate Gifts
Chocolate Truffles
Chorizo
Christmas Pudding
Chutney
Clotted Cream
Costa Rica Coffee
Crab Cakes
Creme Fraiche
Cured Meat
Dark Chocolate
Douwe Egberts
Dried Mushrooms
Dulce de Leche
Dutch Cheese
Edam
English Cheese
Epoisses
Escargot
Espresso Coffee
Extra Virgin Olive Oil
Fair Trade Coffee
Farmers Cheese
Farro
Feta Cheese
Flavored Coffee
Fleur de Sel
Foie Gras
Fontina
French Butter
French Cheese
French Olive Oil
Game Meat
German Cheese
Gjetost Cheese
Gnocchi
Goat Butter
Goat Cheese
Gorgonzola
Gouda Cheese
Gourmet Chocolate
Gourmet Coffee
Gourmet Food
Gourmet Gift Baskets
Gourmet Rice
Grana Padano
Grapeseed Oil
Grass Fed Beef
Greek Cheese
Greek Olive Oil
Ground Coffee
Gruyere Cheese
Guanciale
Halloumi Cheese
Ham
Harissa
Havarti Cheese
Hazelnut Oil
Herbal Tea
Herring
Honey
Hot Cocoa Mix
Hot Sauce
Imported Cheese
Irish Cheese
Italian Cheese
Italian Coffee
Italian Meats
Italian Olive Oil
Italian Pasta
Jamaican Coffee
Jarlsberg Cheese
Jerky
Jolokia Hot Sauce
Kashkaval
Kenya Coffee
Kobe Beef
Kona Coffee
Kosher Cheese
Kosher Food
Lavender Honey
Lavender Soap
Limburger Cheese
Lobster Meals
Manchego Cheese
Maple Syrup
Marzipan
Mascarpone
Matcha Tea
Maytag Blue Cheese
Meats
Mozzarella Cheese
Mustard
Olive Oil
Olive Oil Soap
Olives
Organic Beef
Organic Cheese
Organic Coffee
Organic Dried Fruit
Organic Food
Organic Meat
Organic Nuts
Organic Tea
Panettone
Parmesan
Parmigiano Reggiano
Pasta Sauce
Pate
Pecorino
Pine Nuts
Prosciutto
Provolone
Pumpkin Seed Oil
Quinoa
Raclette
Ricotta
Risotto
Roquefort Cheese
Salami
Salsa
Sardines
Sausage
Scorpion Hot Sauce
Sea Salt
Serrano Ham
Sesame Seed Oil
Sharp Cheese
Sherry Vinegar
Shortbread
Smoked Cheese
Smoked Fish
Smoked Ham
Smoked Salmon
Sopressata
Spanish Cheese
Spanish Olive Oil
Steak
Steak Sauce
Stilton
Stinky Cheese
Swiss Cheese
Tazo Tea
Tomato Jam
Truffle Oil
Truffles
Tuna
Tupelo Honey
Turkey
Unique Gift Baskets
Vermont Cheese
Walnut Oil
Washed Rind Cheese
Whole Bean Coffee
Wine and Cheese
Wisconsin Cheese
American Food
Argentinian Food
Australian Food
British Food
Canadian Food
Dutch Food
English Food
French Food
German Food
Greek Food
Irish Food
Israeli Food
Italian Food
Mexican Food
Middle Eastern Food
Portuguese Food
Polish Food
Scottish Food
Spanish Food
Swedish Food

BizRate Customer Certified (GOLD) Site - igourmet.com Reviews at Bizrate

Italian Meats

ITALIAN MEATS   


ABOUT ITALIAN MEATS

Order Italian Meats Online at the #1 Source for Gourmet Food and Gift Baskets

Buy Italian Meats online from igourmet.com! Please visit our online store and go shopping at the number one imported food delivery service in the USA. From Coppa to Cotechino, Italian Meats run the gamut of flaovrs and textures. Most cured meats that we enjoy in America are based on original Italian recipes. Types of Italian Meats include Salami, Soppresata, Prosciutto, Pepperoni and more. Both beef and pork are important in the world of Italian Meats. Spices are also on the center stage of the Italian Meats performance.

Italy has been the worldwide pioneer in the techniques of curing meats since ancient Roman times. Curing is the age-old process of preserving fresh meat through salting, smoking and air-drying Italian Meats. Pork is the most common cured meat in Italy, although other meats such as beef, venison and wild boar are also cured. Each region of Italy is known for its own cured meats, known as salumi, based on local customs. Spice plays an important role in the curing of Italian Meats. Typically, Italian Meats from the south tend to be spicier than those from northern Italy.

Cured Italian Meats fall into two basic categories: cured meats that have been taken from whole cuts of meat, and cured meats that have been molded from ground meat and stuffed into casings. Cured meat plays a prominent role in the Italian antipasto, meaning "before the meal". An antipasto is a first course, traditionally consisting of foods such as sliced cured meats, cheeses and vegetables.

Types of Cured Italian Meats:

Bresaola: This cut of air-dried beef originally from Aosta is deep red in color and delicately flavored. Bresaola is delicious when sliced thinly, coated with olive oil and drizzled with lemon juice and capers. Like most Italian Meats, its production has spread beyond its original area of development to other parts of Italy and is also made by manufacturers of Italian Meats around the globe. Shop brands of Bresaola: Beretta  Creminelli  Bernina of Uruguay

Cacciatore: This cured sausage, the smallest form of all Italian Meats, translates to "Hunter's Salami". These sweet, dry sausages are characterized not only by their small size but also their boisterous, spicy flavor. Cacciatore Salami are great for picnics or antipasto.

Capicola: This Italian Meat is perhaps more popular in the US than in southern Italy where it was first produced. Capicola is called for in most American recipes for an Italian Hoagie or Italian Sub. Made from pork shoulder butt that is brine soaked then cooked, Capicola is seasoned with hot pepper flakes, salt and garlic. Like many Italian Meats, it has a marbled appearance and a rich, bold flavor. Capicola

Coppa: This famous Italian cut of ham is a salted, seasoned and dry-cured thinly cut pork shoulder or neck. Coppa is a typical addition to an antipasto plate, served alongside other cured Italian Meats and enjoyed with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil. Coppa

Cotechino: An example of the best of northern Italian Meats, Cotechino is closely reated to a similar salami called Zampone. This boiled Italian sausage originated in Modena in the early 1500s, and its production soon spread throughout all of Emilia-Romagna and into neighboring Lombardy and the Veneto. Typically served with lentils as a celebratory dish at New Year's, Cotechino is now enjoyed year round in Italy and by fans of Italian cuisine around the world. Cotechino

Culatello: One of our favorite Italian Meats from Parma, Culatello is to Prosciutto as Filet Mignon is to steak. The most famous variety is Culatello di Zibello, hailing from the town of the same name. Culatello is banned from import into the US because of health concerns arising from its production methods. This prime cut of ham is first seasoned and salted, then it is inserted into a pig's bladder and shaped with twine into an oblong form. This most elusive of all Italian Meats is then cured for up to 12 months in specially designated aging buildings near the Po River where the river mist stimulates molds on the walls and ceiling, imparting the meat with a flavor that simply cannot be duplicated.

Guanciale: Although not an Italian Meat that belongs on the classic antipasto platter, Guanciale excels as a cooking ingredient. Guanciale is made of cured pork jowl and is used like Pancetta to add flavor and richness to pasta, risotto and stews. This traditional Italian Meat has a good amount of flavorful fat with striations of meat running throughout. Guanciale is often flavored with black pepper, garlic and rosemary mixed into its cure. Cubed up and fried until crispy, Guanciale is most often encountered in the classic dish, Pasta all'Amatriciana. Guanciale

Lardo: While not technically a meat perhaps, Lardo is a salt-cured cut of pork back fat, spiced with black pepper, nutmeg and other savory additions. Locally popular in the Valle d'Aosta and other regions of the northern part of Italy, Lardo is served in a similar fashion to salami - sliced and included in an antipasto course or on a sandwich. A rare find among Italian Meats in the US, it must be produced locally as it has severe import restrictions. Lardo

Mortadella: Mortadella is one of the most famous Italian Meats worldwide. It was first produced in Bologna and is the ancient ancestor to what Oscar Meyer simply calls Bologna Meat in the US. Unlike ordinary Bologna meat, This cured pork sausage boasts the addition of pork fat and numerous flavorful spices to its recipe. In Italy, Mortadella is often used in sandwiches or as part of the antipasto course. Mortadella

Pancetta: One of the most traditional Italian Meats, this salted, spiced and dry-cured pork belly is served thinly sliced or diced for recipes. An excellent substitute for bacon, Pancetta is perhaps best known for as a key ingredient in Pasta Carbonara. Pancetta

Pepperoni: Pepperoni is type of Salami that is made from lean, coarsely chopped pork and beef. A quality Pepperoni should not be overly spicy, but still robustly flavored with paprika, a mildly hot, somewhat smoky spice. Pepperoni is great as a pizza topping and in sandwiches. We also love it chunked or sliced as a snack. Shop brands of Pepperoni: Molinari  Vermont Smoke

Porchetta: Originally cretaed in the Lazio region of Italy, home to Rome, a discussion of Italian Meats would be incomplete without addressing Porchetta. This boneless pork roast is salted and heartily spiced with garlic, rosemary, fennel, oregano and black pepper. Porchetta makes a great sandwich meat or can be served as an entree as well.

Prosciutto: Also known as Parma Ham, Prosciutto (technically Prosciutto Crudo) is a specialty dry cured (uncooked) ham that undergoes an intensive curing process. The dry curing replaces the need for any cooking. Prosciutto is a ham from the hind leg of a hog or boar, air dried for long periods of time (at least 210 days) under specific climate controls. Prosciutto di Parma is a specific type of Prosciutto from Parma. Another high quality Prosciutto is called Prosciutto di San Daniele. Among the most famous, and versatile, of all Italian Meats, Prosciutto is usually sliced thinly and served in sandwiches, as part of an antipasto course, or used in recipes. Prosciutto Shopping Links: Sliced Italian Prosciutto  Sliced Prosciutto di Parma  Sliced Prosciutto di San Daniele  Whole Leg Prosciutto di Parma

Salame: In America, the word Salame is almost synonymous with the phrase Italian Meats. Just about every region of Italy lays claim to its own particular salame, but the most famous are Genoa, Calabrese, Milano, Varzi and Abbruzzi. This Italian favorite may be made from a one or more of a variety of meats (pork, boar, beef, venison, etc.) and seasoned with ingredients such as herbs, spices, salt, pepper, wine or vinegar. Salami (the plural form of Salame) is made by stuffing the ground meats and seasonings into a casing and then hanging it to cure. In addition to the Salami defined by regional heritage, some other popular variations of Salami include Casalingo (Salami of the House), Sopressata (Pressed and Flattened Salami), Piccante (Spicy Salami), and Cacciatore (Hunter's Salami). Shop Salami Salami

Sopressata: Sopressata is one of the most traditional cured Italian Meats. It is usually a flattened shape (its name incororates the Latin root for pressing), and can be any length from 8 inches to several feet long. Sopressata Salami are often shaped round today, but this flies in the face of tradition. Historically, Sopressata was only produced in the fall when the family's hog was scheduled to be butchered. A classic Sopressata made use of all the cuts from the pig that were left over after the most expensive cuts had been sold off, thus its nickname "poor man's salami." Today, the name Sopressata is simply be applied to any coarse grind, moderately spiced Salami. Shop brands of Sopressata: Aux Delices Des Bois  Beretta  Busseto

Speck Alto Adige: Speck is an Italian bacon from the South Tyrol region of Italy. This Italian Meat is rubbed with spice mix of salt, pepper, juniper berries and various garden herbs. To make Speck, it is first dry cured to preserve the meat. The Speck is then lightly cold smoked over beechwood chips, producing its signature flavor. The Speck is then stacked in aging cellars, where it is slow dried. This maturing is important for this noteworthy Italian Meat to become truly tender. Unlike American bacon, Speck does not require cooking at home. Speck

To find Italian Meats and the best gourmet foods and gift baskets online, begin your search at igourmet.com.

Start Shopping
Simply visit our online store and begin shopping.

Traditional Italian Meats Recipes
igourmet.com lists thousands of recipes online, many of which include Italian Meats as an ingredient. To browse our Recipe Forum, click HERE.

Your #1 Online Italian Meats Shopping Resource
Every gourmet food product on sale at igourmet.com is accompanied by a long story about its history in relation to food culture. Shop for the highest quality, best tasting Italian Meats online at igourmet.com. To view a complete listing of all gourmet foods available online at igourmet, or to buy, please click HERE.

 

 

Copyright 1997 - 2014 igourmet.com. All Rights Reserved.